To the Vale of Graves…

It is at Kensal Green Cemetery in West London on May 21 1860 that Annabella was laid to rest and despite the incorrect spelling of her first name and that she had been born in the home of her mother's great friend Isabella Baker at Elemore Hall, her simple and elegant grave can be discovered in the shadow of the enormous Dissenter's Chapel. And one glorious afternoon in October I took a stroll through this fabulous cemetery to the grave of Byron's spouse...

Leaving Lady B to Dine in Peace!

And there is certainly a 'woman within ken' in the dining room for the walls that I have painted in a distemper inspired by the colour of 'Wedgewood Blue' are now adorned with several female likenesses which feature the likes of the notorious Lady Melbourne, the celebrated Duchess of Devonshire and the sculptor Anne Seymour Damer...

A Stroll Along Piccadilly? Oh! The Agony!

In January I ‘metropolized’ to London for the day and on a quiet and chilly afternoon - I went for a stroll along Piccadilly to take a lingering look at the abode which was the scene of his short and difficult union with the unfortunate, former Annabella Milbanke AND the inspiration for the creation of the 'Ghost of Piccadilly'...

Taking My Leave of Number 13?

"Walked early to look at my old house in Piccadilly - saw into the room where I have sat with him, and felt as if I had lived there with a friend who was long since dead to me." These poignant reflections were noted in Annabella's journal on September 17 in 1820, a mere four years after she had left hearth, home and Byron behind on a cold January day and walked out of the front door of 13 Piccadilly Terrace for the last time...

Slaving Over a Hot Stove – Me Thinks Not!

I profess that cooking is definitely not my forte, I am oblivious to the designs of any kitchen and I would rather spend money on chocolate and books than on any cooking gadget. That said I have had to create a Regency kitchen which now nestles in the basement of my 13 Piccadilly Terrace!